Go to USC home page USC Logo About the PRC
University of South Carolina PRC HomeArnold School of Public Health Home
Projects & Activities
Physical Activity and Public Health Course
Newsletter & Listserv
Research Updates
Reports and Tools
Physical Activity Links
About PRC
Contact PRC
921 Assembly Street
Columbia, SC 29208

p: 803.777.4253
f: 803.777.9007
e: uscprc@mailbox.sc.edu
USC  THIS SITE
 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA
PREVENTION RESEARCH CENTER NOTES
“Promoting Health through Physical Activity”

This newsletter includes a summary of a recently released Scottish report revealing that 56% of students in that country walked to school in 2002 and fewer than 20% traveled by car or van.  That’s amazing!  Today, fewer than 10% of American students walk to school; the vast majority are driven to school by mom or dad.  Although the challenges and barriers to American students walking to school are many, there is hope for a more active future for our youth.  Federal lawmakers are considering the inclusion of a multi-million dollar Safe Routes to School program within the next transportation reauthorization (see newsletter item below).  Other programs and resources are becoming more common as policy makers, research scientists, community leaders and advocates realize that physical activity has been literally engineered out of American’s daily lives.  Hopefully, over time, more American kids will be able to experience what it’s like to safely walk to school like their Scottish peers.

Steven P. Hooker, PhD, Director
Delores Pluto, PhD, Newsletter Editor (dmpluto@sc.edu)
http://prevention.sph.sc.edu
IN THIS ISSUE – February/March 2004

NEWS YOU CAN USE: PEP Grants Available; Website for Physical Education Grants; Older Americans Month to Focus on Living Well; Weekly Fitness Chat

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN WASHINGTON:  Senate Passes TEA-21 Reauthorization Bill

RESEARCH NOTES: Special Issue on Active Lifestyles; Step Per Day Recommendations; Neighborhood Influences on PA in Older Adults; Changes in Fitness and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

REPORTS, SURVEYS, GUIDELINES, RESOURCES: Annual Medical Expenditures Attributable to Obesity; VERB Campaign Evaluation Results; Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity in Schools; New Report Finds Girls Less Active Than Boys; Helping Youth Make Healthy Eating And Fitness Decisions; More Scottish Kids Walk to School; Pre-Formulated Searches for HP2010 Topics; Fact Sheet on Physical Activity and Health; New Interactive Physical Activity Tool

PROMOTING ACTIVE COMMUNITIES: Colorado Safe Routes to School Bill; Safe Routes to School Website; New Smart Growth Publication; New Physical Inactivity Presentation

UPCOMING CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS: Health & Fitness Summit & Exposition; Spark After-School Institute; International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Conference

USC PREVENTION RESEARCH CENTER UPDATE: 2004 Physical Activity and Public Health Courses; PRC Website Redesign


NEWS YOU CAN USE

PEP GRANTS AVAILABLE:

Congress passed the Omnibus spending bill, which includes $69 million for the Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP) in FY04. This is almost a 20% increase over FY03. In 2004, grants will be available for a period of up to three years and will be funded for programs emphasizing comprehensive aspects of lifelong health and fitness, including nutrition. Applications, which are due by March 22, are available at http://www.ed.gov/programs/whitephysed/index.html
<back to top>

WEBSITE FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION GRANTS:

PEgrants.com has resources and information for writing and receiving grants related to physical education. The site, sponsored by Sportime, has information on grant opportunities (including PEP) as well as links to information on physical education advocacy, programs, and fundraising opportunities. To find out more go to .
http://www.sportime.com/sportime-shared/news/110402.jsp

<back to top>

OLDER AMERICANS MONTH TO FOCUS ON LIVING WELL:

The theme for Older Americans Month – May 2004 – is “Aging Well, Living Well.” The theme has been chosen to celebrate older Americans living longer, healthier, and more productive lives and gives organizations the opportunity to highlight issues relating to aging and living well, including being physically active. Visit http://www.aoa.gov/press/oam/oam.asp for more information.
<back to top>

WEEKLY FITNESS CHAT:

USA Today hosts a fitness chat each Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. EST on their website. Visit http://cgi1.usatoday.com/mchat/20040218001/tscript.htm for more information.
<back to top>

For a list of PA related observances and events, visit the PA links section of our website at http://prevention.sph.sc.edu/PAlinks/index.htm.


WHAT’S HAPPENING IN WASHINGTON

SENATE PASSES TEA-21 REAUTHORIZATION BILL:

The Senate passed their version of the TEA-21 reauthorization bill. The proposed funding of $318 billion allocates $70 million per year for a national Safe Routes to School program and $4.79 billion for the Enhancements program over six years. The Transportation & Infrastructure Committee of the House of Representatives will consider their bill (H.R. 3550 "TEA-LU") the first week of March, and then the full House will vote on the measure. Follow the progress of transportation reauthorization at http://thomas.loc.gov
<back to top>


RESEARCH NOTES

SPECIAL ISSUE ON ACTIVE LIFESTYLES:

Leisure Science plans to publish a special journal issue on the topic of "Leisure and Active Lifestyles” in mid to late 2005. Abstracts of empirical research, conceptual papers, and integrative reviews are being accepted, and they should focus on leisure and recreation as a context for examining the meanings of active living. Abstracts can be emailed to karla@email.unc.edu and moon@email.unc.edu. Manuscripts of accepted abstracts will be due by August 15, 2004. (Livability Listserv, 1/26/04)
<back to top>

STEP PER DAY RECOMMENDATIONS:

The use of pedometers for tracking physical activity has been increasing, with the popular recommendation of accumulating 10,000 steps/day.  This review of past studies provides the rationale and evidence for general pedometer indices for public health research and physical activity recommendations.  The authors determined that making incremental increases in physical activity (increasing by a minimum of 2500 steps/day) above usual daily activity could lead to improved health outcomes.  The following indices were proposed to classify pedometer guidelines in healthy adults:  1) < 5000 steps/day is typical of a sedentary lifestyle; 2) 5000-7499 steps/day is representative of usual daily activity and may be considered “low active”; 3) 7500-9999 steps/day might be considered “somewhat active”; and 4) ³ 10,000 steps/day used to classify individuals as “active.”  Individuals taking > 12,500 steps/day would be classified as “highly active.” Tudor-Locke and Bassett. “How Many Steps/Day Are Enough?: Preliminary Pedometer Indices for Public Health.” Sports Medicine, 34(1):1-8, 2004.
<back to top>

NEIGHBORHOOD INFLUENCES ON PA IN OLDER ADULTS:

A sample of 582 community-dwelling residents age 65 years and older was taken from 56 neighborhoods in Portland, Oregon.  Individuals living in more socially cohesive neighborhoods reported higher levels of neighborhood walking compared to people from less cohesive neighborhoods.  Low income, senior population density, percentage of white residents, and average facilities per neighborhood acre were all significantly related to neighborhood walking.  Overall, neighborhood variables jointly accounted for 84% of the variation in walking activity between different neighborhoods. Fisher, Li, Michael, and Cleveland. “Neighborhood-Level Influences on Physical Activity Among Older Adults:  A Multilevel Analysis.” Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, (11):45-63, 2004.
<back to top>

CHANGES IN FITNESS AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK FACTORS:

Approximately 2,500 young men and women between the ages of 18 and 30 participated in CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults), a 15-year longitudinal cohort study. Participants with low to moderate fitness at baseline were twice as likely to develop hypertension, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome as participants in the high fitness category.  Change in fitness was inversely correlated with weight gain over 7 and 15 years.  Carnethon, Gidding, Nehgme, et al. “Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Young Adulthood and the Development of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors. JAMA, 290(23):3092-3100.
<back to top>

For additional summaries of recent research on promoting physically active lifestyles, visit the Research Updates section of our website at http://prevention.sph.sc.edu/updates/index.htm.


REPORTS, SURVEYS, GUIDELINES, RESOURCES

ANNUAL MEDICAL EXPENDITURES ATTRIBUTABLE TO OBESITY:

U.S. obesity‑attributable medical expenditures cost an estimated $75 billion in 2003, and taxpayers supported half of that cost through Medicaid and Medicare, according to a new report from RTI International and the CDC. The estimated percentage of annual medical expenditures due to obesity in each state ranged from 4% in Arizona to 6.7% in Alaska. The report, State‑Level Estimates of Annual Medical Expenditures Attributable to Obesity, is published in the January 2004 issue of “Obesity Research” and is available for $5.00 from http://www.obesityresearch.org/cgi/content/abstract/12/1/18. (Livability Listserv, 1/26/04)
<back to top>

VERB CAMPAIGN EVALUATION RESULTS:

Survey results released from the CDC show that its national youth media campaign VERB has had an impact on children’s physical activity levels. Survey results showed a 34% increase in weekly free‑time physical activity sessions among children ages 9‑10 in the United States with a 27% increase for girls between the ages of 9 and 13 and a 24% increase for children from lower‑middle income households. Read the press release at http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r040217.htm or learn more about the VERB campaign at www.cdc.gov/VERB
<back to top>

NUTRITION, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, AND OBESITY IN SCHOOLS:

Over 1,000 web site visitors responded to the Center for Health and Health Care in Schools’ obesity survey describing how their schools have responded to the obesity epidemic, and the results are now available. Results include information about obesity concern in school communities, school actions undertaken to increase physical activity and to improve nutrition, the top five barriers to change, and the time allocated to prevention work. Read the results at http://www.healthinschools.org/sh/obesresults.asp
<back to top>

NEW REPORT FINDS GIRLS LESS ACTIVE THAN BOYS:

The Harvard Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity and the National Women’s Law Center have released a report that finds Massachusetts girls consistently participate in less physical activity than boys. “Keeping Score: Girls Participation in High School Athletics in Massachusetts” examines the gender disparities in physical activity among Massachusetts high school students and offers several recommendation for improving gender equity.  Visit http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/press/releases/sports/
keepingscorereport.pdf to view the full report.
<back to top>

HELPING YOUTH MAKE HEALTHY EATING AND FITNESS DECISIONS:

“THE POWER OF CHOICE: Helping Youth Make Healthy Eating and Fitness Decisions, A Leader’s Guide” is a guide for after-school program leaders who work with adolescents. Developed by the FDA and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service, The Power of Choice helps adolescents improve decision-making skills that promote healthy eating and physical activity using 10 interactive sessions. Program components can be downloaded from the web at http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/power_of_choice.html. (CDC PA List, 1/23/04)
<back to top>

MORE SCOTTISH KIDS WALK TO SCHOOL:

A recently released Scottish report reveals that 56% of students walked to school in 2002 and less than 20% traveled by car or van. Almost two-thirds of those who took motorized transport said public transportation was unavailable. The number of students walking is the highest since the data were first collected in 1999. Visit http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/bulletins/00316-00.asp to read more. (pednet)
<back to top>

PRE-FORMULATED SEARCHES FOR HP2010 TOPICS:

The HP2010 Information Access Project is a website that allows users to search for published literature related to Healthy People 2010 focus areas, including physical fitness. The searches are pre-formulated and link to articles from PubMed. The search can be accessed at http://phpartners.org/hp/index.html
<back to top>

FACT SHEET ON PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH:

The President’s Council on Physical Fitness has published a fact sheet on the relationship between regular physical activity and health. The fact sheet discusses the economic and health consequences of physical inactivity and provides statistics for physical inactivity and obesity rates. To read “Physical Activity and Health” go to http://fitness.gov/physical_activity_fact_sheet.html. (Livability Listserv, 1/26/04)
<back to top>

NEW INTERACTIVE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TOOL:

The CDC has a new physical activity interactive statistics website that provides a tool for comparing physical activity data from the BRFSS. The site provides metropolitan area and state PA statistics and can compare state data by demographic factors (age, race/ethnicity, gender, and education). Find the tool at http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/stats/us_physical_activity/. (CDC PA Listserv)
<back to top>

PROMOTING ACTIVE COMMUNITIES

COLORADO SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL BILL:

Lawmakers from Colorado have introduced a Safe Routes to School bill that will utilize a portion of federal safety funds for projects around schools. Improvements may include creating bike lanes, multi‑use paths, paved shoulders, sidewalks, safer road crossings, safety signs, traffic calming measures, bicycle parking, and safety education. Visit http://bicyclecolo.org/site/page.cfm?PageID=451 for the latest information.
<back to top>

SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL WEBSITE:

The Active Living Network has a Safe Routes to School (SR2S) website that contains a collection of resources, including downloadable fact sheets, presentations, articles, and supporting materials as well as links to advocacy organizations and state SR2S programs. Visit the site at http://www.activeliving.org/index.php/Safe_Routes_to_School/76. (bikeleague news)
<back to top>

NEW SMART GROWTH PUBLICATION:

The Smart Growth Network and the International City/County Management Association (ICMA) have released a second volume of “Getting to Smart Growth” that can serve as a roadmap for states and communities wanting to implement smart growth policies and strategies. “Getting to Smart Growth II: 100 More Policies for Implementation” provides 10 policy options for implementing the 10 principles of smart growth (one of which is creating walkable communities). The publication is free from the Smart Growth Network and can be downloaded or ordered from http://www.smartgrowth.org/library/articles.asp?art=870&res=1024. (Livability Listserv, 1/13/04)
<back to top>

NEW PHYSICAL INACTIVITY PRESENTATION:

The Active Living Resource Center (ALRC) has developed a new presentation, “The Inactivity Epidemic,” which details the inactivity problem and the role of community design in its solution. The 15-minute PowerPoint presentation is easily adaptable to different states or regions. Visit http://www.bikewalk.org/PubHealth.htm to download the presentation or order a CD-ROM. (Centerlines #89)
<back to top>


UPCOMING CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS

HEALTH & FITNESS SUMMIT & EXPOSITION:

The 8th annual ACSM Health & Fitness Summit & Exposition will be held April 14-17, 2004 in Orlando, FL. Visit http://www.acsm.org/meetings/summit.htm for more information and to register.
<back to top>

SPARK AFTER-SCHOOL INSTITUTE:

SPARK will hold an After-School (Active Recreation) Institute on April 15-16, 2004 in San Diego, CA. For more information visit www.sparkpe.org (see the "Institutes" tab at the top), call 800-SPARK PE ext 204 or e-mail jfrank@sparkpe.org.
<back to top>

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CONFERENCE:

The Third Annual Conference of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) will be held in Washington, DC on June 10-13, 2004. The late-breaking submission deadline is March 19, 2004. To find out more information and to register go to http://www.isbnpa.org/meeting.cfm.
<back to top>

For a more complete list of conferences and workshops, visit the PA links section of our website at http://prevention.sph.sc.edu/PAlinks/index.htm.


USC PREVENTION RESEARCH CENTER UPDATE

2004 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND PUBLIC HEALTH COURSES:

The Physical Activity and Public Health Courses (PAPH), sponsored by the University of South Carolina Prevention Research Center and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is entering its 10th year of successful training for researchers and public health practitioners. The 2004 PAPH courses will be held September 14‑22, 2004 in Park City, Utah. Approximately 25 fellows will be accepted for each course. For more information, go to http://prevention.sph.sc.edu/seapines/index.htm or contact Janna Borden at (803) 576‑6050 or janna.borden@sc.edu.
<back to top>

PRC WEBSITE REDESIGN:

The USC PRC is in the process of redesigning its website. Watch for the new look soon at http://prevention.sph.sc.edu.
<back to top>
Writers: Tracy Pearch, Joshua Swift, and Delores Pluto

This and past issues of the “University of South Carolina Prevention Research Center Notes” are available on our website at http://prevention.sph.sc.edu/Newsletter/index.htm.  To submit an item, please e-mail Delores Pluto at dmpluto@sc.edu.

To subscribe or unsubscribe to this newsletter, e-mail the Prevention Research Center at USCPRC@gwm.sc.edu. When subscribing, please include your name, e-mail address, title, and organizational affiliation. There is no subscription cost.  If you have an e-mail filter in place that only allows messages from approved email addresses, please add uscprc@gwm.sc.edu to your approved list.

For continuing discussions about physical activity, join the Physical Activity and Public Health On-Line Network listserv. Instructions are located on our website, at http://prevention.sph.sc.edu/newsletter/commands.htm.

The USC Prevention Research Center is a member of the CDC Prevention Research Center’s National Network, consisting of 28 Centers in the U.S.  For more information about the PRC National Network, visit http://www.cdc.gov/prc.
Prevention Research Center
Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina
730 Devine Street, Columbia, South Carolina 29208
803-777-4253

Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


NEWSLETTER LINKS

Newsletter Info
Subscribe to Newsletter

2010 Newsletters
2009 Newsletters
2008 Newsletters
2007 Newsletters
2006 Newsletters
2005 Newsletters
2004 Newsletters
2003 Newsletters
2002 Newsletters
2001 Newsletters
2000 Newsletters
1999 Newsletters
1998 Newsletters
1997 Newsletters


RETURN TO TOP USC LINKS: DIRECTORY MAP EVENTS VIP SITE INFORMATION